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Finally Got Those Pillows I Wanted!

November 17, 2011

I have now made two of my very own sweater pillows and I would have to say that I am quite pleased with them. I have a number of sweaters yet to do (one of which I am quite excited about but you will have to be in suspense for a bit longer). Here’s the low-down on how I transformed thrift store sweaters into super comfy pillows.

The first sweater was a Gap women’s sweater. I almost felt guilty cutting this sweater in half! But it was a super soft sweater and exactly the shade of red I was looking for. Originally, I was going to sew the sweater to fit this old pillow that I had, but as you will see, I quickly changed my mind on that.

First I cut through both sides of the sweater directly under the arm seams while the sweater was turned inside out. I decided to keep the seams that were already sewn into the sides of the sweater, which is why my pillow changed from a square to a rectangle.

With the material still inside out, I held the top edge together and stitched the top side closed with a simple, looping stitch. (I am certainly not a sewing guru by any stretch of the imagination so this is how I did it. I figured that as long as I kept the stitches very even, the seam would lie straight.)

I then started making the same stitch on the other side with the sweater inside out. When I was about 2/3 done with that side, I turned the sweater right side out and firmly stuffed it with polyester fiberfill.

You want to make sure that you put enough fiberfill in so that the pillow will not quickly get flimsy or lose its shape.

I then finished sewing the last seam.

To add some interest, I made a tight rosette out of the ribbing from the bottom of the sweater. I folded the ribbing in half lengthwise and started rolling it up while stitching through all the layers at each full turn.

I marked the center of the pillow and then sewed the rosette on, pulling the thread tightly through all layers of the pillow.

Sadly, I just realized that the only picture I have of the final product is this one from my cell phone. The pillow is already at the house I am moving to, so this picture will just have to do, I guess.

I love how it turned out. It is extremely soft and comfortable to lay on since even the rosette is made from the soft sweater material.

Next, I decided to make a large pillow covering for an old sofa pillow that I had. I used a men’s extra large sweater, which gave me ample material. I turned it inside out and cut through both layers directly under the arm seams.

I kept one of the seams from the side of the sweater and sewed together the two long seams. Since I was putting a pillow form into this one, I wanted to sew in a zipper so that I could toss the sweater into the wash every once in a while.

I turned the sweater right side out and folded and pinned down a hem inside the sweater. I then centered and pinned one side of a 7 inch zipper onto the seam so that the right side of the zipper was on the outside.

I then sewed on the first side of the zipper.

Next, I folded down the other side of the sweater, opened the zipper and pinned the unsewn side to the inside of the pillow cover.

After finishing sewing the zipper, I turned the sweater inside out once again and finished sewing the final side together.

If I were to do this again, I would use a 9 inch zipper since I really had to stuff the pillow in. However, it ended up working and is another super comfy living room pillow.

I love cable knit patterns. I also love sweater pillows that are much cheaper than the pillows I had found online previously!

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From → Crafting

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